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5 posts from collaboration with Mya Smith

Bluegill Glass Mosaic No. 2, 2006

Bluegill Glass Mosaic No. 2, 2006
Bluegill Mosaic No. 2, 2006
Sicis Iridium glass tile, glass taxidermy eye, copper.
11" H x 17.5" W x 1.5" D
Purchase Bluegill Mosaic No. 2 for $550
($500 plus $50 S+H).
SOLD

My daughter Mya did so well last summer  helping me with mosaic that this year I had her create a whole line of fish. She got to do the fun parts—laying the tile and working out the gradients and shading— I did the mortar, grout, copper banding and provided some small amount of editorial assistance. The work sells at the normal studio rate because it's totally worth it. Her skills are far beyond what you'd expect from a teenager, or even most professional artists.

Most of the tile used on this mosaic is from the Iridium line of glass from Sicis. As the light or viewing angle changes, the iridescent surface of the tile closely resembles the  scales of a live fish. The   photo above shows the iridescent sheen. The second pic shows the copper banding that finishes and protects the mosaic.

Mosaic is set with mortar on a Hardibacker substrate over plywood and finished around the edges with copper banding. Indoors or out, this mosaic will last lifetimes.

Bluegill Glass Mosaic No. 2, 2006

Lake Trout Glass Mosaic, 2006

Lake Trout Glass Mosaic, 2006
Lake Trout Mosaic, 2006
Sicis Iridium glass tile, glass taxidermy eye, copper, Hardibacker substrate.
11" H x 18.5" W x 1.5" D
Collaboration: John T. Unger + Mya Smith
Private Collection 

My daughter Mya did so well last summer  helping me with mosaic that this year I had her create a whole line of fish. She got to do the fun parts—laying the tile and working out the gradients and shading— I did the mortar, grout, copper banding and provided some small amount of editorial assistance. The work sells at the normal studio rate because it's totally worth it. Her skills are far beyond what you'd expect from a teenager, or even most professional artists.

Most of the tile used on this mosaic is from the Iridium line of glass from Sicis. As the light or viewing angle changes, the iridescent surface of the tile closely resembles the  scales of a live fish. The   photo above shows the iridescent sheen. The second pic shows the copper banding that finishes and protects the mosaic.

The mosaic is set with mortar on a Hardibacker substrate over plywood and finished around the edges with copper banding. Indoors or out, this mosaic will last lifetimes.

Lake Trout Glass Mosaic, 2006

Brook Trout Mosaic No. 1, 2006

Brook Trout Glass Mosaic No. 1
Brook Trout Mosaic No. 1, 2006
Sicis Iridium glass tile, glass taxidermy eye, copper, Hardibacker substrate.
11" H x 19" W x 1.5" D
Collaboration: John T. Unger + Mya Smith
Private Collection 

My daughter Mya did so well last summer  helping me with mosaic that this year I had her create a whole line of fish. She got to do the fun parts—laying the tile and working out the gradients and shading— I did the mortar, grout, copper banding and provided some small amount of editorial assistance. The work sells at the normal studio rate because it's totally worth it. Her skills are far beyond what you'd expect from a teenager, or even most professional artists.

Most of the tile used on this mosaic is from the Iridium line of glass from Sicis. As the light or viewing angle changes, the iridescent surface of the tile closely resembles the  scales of a live fish. The   photo above shows the iridescent sheen. The second pic shows the copper banding that finishes and protects the mosaic.

The mosaic is set with mortar on a Hardibacker substrate over plywood and finished around the edges with copper banding. Indoors or out, this mosaic will last lifetimes.

Brook Trout Glass Mosaic

Little Red Riding Hood Narrative Sculpture

little Red riding hood sculpture
Little Red Riding Hood Narrative Sculpture, 2006
Recycled steel,

8.75" H x 20.25" W x 10" D
Private Collection
Collaboration with Mya Smith
 

Little Red Riding Hood is a narrative sculpture that my daughter Mya and I collaborated on. The drawing is hers, the cutting and welding I did. I love the way that she used the tree and the headboard to separate the story into three panels with three scenes.

This one was almost the end of the process, because I made her re-draw the woodcutter about 12 times to get more of a dynamic swing to his axe… she was really frustrated by that, but in the end we both felt the results were worth it.

little red riding hood detail little red riding hood detail little red riding hood detail
click thumbnail to view larger image. enlarge

The 3 Little Pigs: A Story in Steel

3 little Pigs steel sculpture
3 Little Pigs Story in Steel, 2006
Recycled steel,

14" H x 26" W x 6" D
Collaboration with Mya Smith
Private Collection

My daughter Mya is interested in making comics and she's pretty amazing at it…draws and writes very well. So when she came out this summer, I thought it would be cool to collaborate on some narrative steel sculptures together. She picked the stories, and decided how to lay out the image so that it would carry a narrative without words. I did the cutting and welding and offered a wee bit of editorial assistance in the few places where I thought the image or flow of the story could be stronger. Even though we worked pretty closely together on these, I think Mya could have done them alone if she wasn't a little bit afraid of the sparks in the shop.

The house is made from an old refrigerator drawer and the rest is recycled steel plate. The wind from the wolf's mouth is copper plated welding rod. The plants are scrap left over from cutting out the flames on the Firebird Grill.

This piece sold to Checkered House Gallery the minute Tess saw it.

Mya 3Pigs 2-2 Mya 3Pigs 3-2
click thumbnail to view larger image. enlarge
John T. Unger